Mille-Feuille with coffee mousse and pistachio

And here is the new appointment, the sixth, with King-cake: and my recipe is the puff pastry with coffee mousse and pistachio. Obviously the puff pastry should be done at home. The original recipe used quick puff pastry, I have instead prepared the traditional approach according to the recipe of Michael Roux (I found by clicking here). I pulled the sheet up to 2 millimeters thick because I wanted some thin sheets and nicely caramelized, I did some mignon (are tiny, 3 cm to 6 rectangles about) and I paired the Sicilian pistachio mousse with a coffee mousse, to counter the sweetness of pistachio. Flaky pastry apart (Needless to say, prepare it at home is a long and tiring but very, immense satisfaction), the two mousses are very easy to do, for which you have no excuse not to try this puff pastry: Although the pastry was ' bought elsewhere’ the result would be great.

Ingredients for 6-8 people:

for the pastry click here for the recipe, I did the full dose and frozen less than half, realizing the puff pastry with the remaining (recipe by Michael Roux)

  • powdered sugar as required
  • granulated sugar cash as required

for the two mousses

  • 250 grams mascarpone
  • 100 grams of caster sugar cash
  • 380 grams of cream
  • 2 tablespoons of Sicilian pistachio paste
  • 2 tablespoons strong coffee paste
  • a pinch of cinnamon

Assuming that you have already prepared puff pastry, Sprinkle the work surface with icing sugar and granulated sugar pastry with a rolling pin and work up to draw a rectangle the same size of your baking sheet, rolling out the dough to a thickness of about 2-3 mm (If the pastry you like very thin like me, If you like high instead roll out to 5-7 mm thick). Put the rectangle of dough on the baking sheet lined with parchment paper with the sugary side facing upward and bucherellarlo lightly with a fork. Bake at 200 degrees until golden brown (about 15 minutes). Allow to cool and with a knife cut the dough into rectangles approximately 3X6 cm, without pinching the dough while cutting (I recommend using a hacksaw blade and use it just like a small saw, not pressing but crawling).

For the mousse, work the mascarpone with a spoon until it becomes soft, Add the sugar cash and divide it into two equal parts. In a pasta of pistachios, another coffee paste and a pinch of cinnamon. Mix well and refrigerate. Whip the cream until stiff but not too firm (otherwise the mousse will give you a feeling of fatness in mouth) and divide the cream into two equal parts. Merge each part of cream to each of the two compounds of mascarpone cheese using a spatula, with a slight movement from top to bottom to incorporate air and alleviate the mousse. Put each mousse into a piping bag with a star tip and allow to cool in the refrigerator for about an hour.

Stuff the puff pastry with the two mousses, alternating on rectangles of puff pastry and doing for every two layers of mousse with three mignon pastry. Sprinkle with icing sugar and serve.

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8 comments

MERIS March 21, 2014 at 07:45

I'm used’ beautiful and from the picture you can see! Vist Ada

Reply
Sicilians creative in the kitchen March 21, 2014 at 12:18

For photos as always I can't take no merit, but for the pasta I followed the advice of Roux and Ducasse! You're always a treasure Meris!

Reply
Elisa March 20, 2014 at 15:07

Brava ada!!
and how could be differently!!!
beautiful your pastry so thin, who knows that crispiness.
then coffee and pistachio…. goodness!!
bravaaaaa

Hi

Elisa

Reply
Sicilians creative in the kitchen March 20, 2014 at 15:12

Hello Elisa! Thanks as always, you're a sweetheart!!! A hug, ADA

Reply
Isabel March 20, 2014 at 09:56

I want to make the dough so!!!! You're a bomber to my kg too!!! After the quiche, I have to do this browse for King-cake!!

Reply
Sicilians creative in the kitchen March 20, 2014 at 13:22

Isabel, I'm sure you don't have pounds! The recipe of the dough is fabulous, because it is not mine but of Michael Roux!!!! A hug! ADA

Reply
Carmela March 20, 2014 at 03:08

I wonder if you have the recipe for “turronette”
My Sicilian family and nobody remembers ninth
as oreparaba.
Carmela Parekh and I'm living in Argentina.
Thank you very much!

Reply
Sicilians creative in the kitchen March 20, 2014 at 14:34

Hi Carmela, explain better what this turronette, what ingredients have, and I see how I can help. The name doesn't mean anything to me but if you tell me the ingredients maybe I can better understand. ADA

Reply

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