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Pork loin with quince

Pork loin with quince

Apples and pork, perfect match. So why not try to match pork loin with quince? A fruit of season that gives us, in addition to great emotions in sweet with the COTOGNATA- (even in VIDEO RECIPE) or with the QUINCE APPLE JAM, also tasty second courses. I chose pork because I particularly like it in combination with apples. And so I immediately thought that you could marry very well even with quince, that are firmer and sour. In fact, the result is extraordinary.

I had already done the PORK WITH APPLES AND POTATOES And the LOIN STUFFED WITH APPLE PUREE, but the surnames take this dish to another level. With a stronger and more complex taste, also thanks to the orange juice and the balsamic scent of rosemary.

The recipe is very simple and includes only two steps. A precoture of the quince in the pan with spices, some’ of butter and white wine and then cooking the pork in a pan. The apples are added to the pork at the end of cooking and part is smoothed to obtain a delicious sauce. I fenced the pork loin with rosemary and orange slices (as in ORANGE LOIN WITH DRIED FIGS AND CHESTNUTS) and I added orange juice and wine in cooking.

As always, to make sure you cook the meat optimally (the pig, if overcooked, becomes dry and stopped), I suggest you buy the famous kitchen thermometer, essential tool. Save the recipe of pork loin with quince because it could also be useful in view of the holidays. Hoping to spend at least Christmas evening with the family: let's behave well. Obviously I recommend you take a look at all my RECIPES WITH PORK . And I wish you a good day.

PORK LOIN WITH QUINCE

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PORTIONS: 6 PREPARATION TIME: COOKING TIME:

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 kilo of pork loin in one piece
  • a red onion
  • 5 quince
  • half a glass of dry Marsala
  • 2 organic oranges
  • Fresh Rosemary, to taste
  • extra virgin olive oil, to taste
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 300 milliliters of white wine
  • 100 milliliters of vegetable broth
  • a knob of butter
  • a pinch of cinnamon
  • a teaspoon of sugar

PROCEEDINGS

Pork loin with quince

Slice half an orange into not too thin slices, squeeze the rest and set aside. Salt the pork loin by rubbing it with salt and pepper on each side, put on top the orange slices and two sprigs of rosemary, then tie it with the kitchen twine. To see how you tie a piece of meat, look at the VIDEO RECIPE of MILK PORK, where you can see the ligature phase well.

Clean quince: I suggest you wash them well, then cut in half and then in quarters. Remove the peel, remove the seeds and the inner part which is hard and fibrous, then cut the cut into not too thin slices and soak them for a few minutes in cold water with lemon juice. Put in a pan little oil and a nut of butter, heat and add the quince. Brown the quince over high heat until well golden brown. Add salt, pepper and a pinch of cinnamon, then sugar and blend with Marsala. Let the alcohol fade, then cover and cook until the surnames are soft but still firm. Taste to see if you don't need to add more salt or a pinch of sugar to get the right balance of flavors.

Finely chop the onion. In another pan, brown pork loin in extra virgin olive oil, turning it over from each side so that it turns out to be well golden. Add to onion, brown it a few seconds and add the white wine. Bring to a boil and let the alcohol fade, then add the orange juice. After about 30 minutes, add the quince to the pan and continue cooking. For cooking times, as always I recommend the use of the mythicalkitchen thermometer. Put it in the center of the loin: the temperature will reach 55 degrees to the heart, sign of a rosy and juicy meat.

When the loin is cooked, remove it from the pan and wrap in aluminum foil, so that it stays warm. Blend a small part of quince with little hot vegetable broth, so you get a fluid sauce. Cut the pork loin into thin slices and serve with the sauce and quince. Bon appétit!

Pork loin with quincePork loin with quince
Pork loin with quincePork loin with quince

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